Chevy Racing–Kentucky–Jimmie Johnson

NASCAR SPRINT CUP SERIES
QUAKER STATE 400
KENTUCKY SPEEDWAY
TEAM CHEVY DRIVER PRESS CONFERENCE TRANSCRIPT
JUNE 28, 2013
 
JEFF GORDON, NO. 24 DRIVE TO END HUNGER CHEVROLET SS, met with media and discussed the ‘race to the Chase’, going to the Yankee game with his son, being recognized in New York City, his qualifying efforts, the upcoming Brickyard 400, and more. FULL TRANSCRIPT:
 
TALK ABOUT YOUR MINDSET BEFORE WE SET THE FIELD FOR THE CHASE:
“We know that this is an important race for us and every one from here on out is going to be crucial for us to get ourselves into the Chase as well as be a threat for the championship. You always know if you’re in it, then you have a shot at winning. Anything is possible when you accomplish that. We know that we’ve got to work hard and keep our heads up and build some momentum off the great run last week and here at Kentucky, this is crucial for us to run well here on a 1.5-mile and follow-up what we did at Sonoma, with a great run on an oval. Today went really well. It’s been a good day. It’s been a good week and I’m very happy with the car and hopefully we can follow that up in qualifying.”
 
CAN YOU RECALL ANY OTHER POINT IN YOUR CAREER WHEN YOU HAD THIS KIND OF URGENCY AND WERE WONDERING WHAT’S GOING ON AND WHEN ARE THINGS GOING TO FALL INTO PLACE?
“Last year. It’s pretty familiar to us. Maybe not quite at this level; I think we were further back than 10th at this point last year than we are now. So, obviously last year things didn’t go so well. I would point out this year and then 2000. Those are some years that stand out to me. There was one when we didn’t win a race. But I thought that year when we didn’t win a race that we actually had several shots at winning races and we finished second quite a few times. So it wasn’t quite like dealing with some of the things we’ve had this year. Yeah, you know, it’s certainly been frustrating.
 
“I think that this team, the way I look at our team, is that we have high expectations put on us. We know the pressure that comes along with that to perform. And when we don’t, the criticism comes with that. But I also know that nobody is more capable of pulling ourselves out of a hole and getting back on track than this team. It’s Hendrick Motorsports. It’s the No. 24 team and we have the capability of being very, very strong and getting on a roll.
 
“So, you just never give up. You never lose faith in one another. We lost a little confidence in ourselves with some of the things happened. Qualifying, primarily; I think in the race we seem to be able to perform pretty well if we’re there, if we have a car in one piece. But when you get caught up in some wrecks and some different things, it can definitely be a little frustrating. But the qualifying is what has broken our confidence down a little bit. And so hopefully we can qualify a little bit better today.”
 
TALK ABOUT YOUR DAY WITH (SON) LEO AT YANKEE STADIUM:
“It was unbelievable. I took my daughter when she was around the same age and it was a really special experience for me and her and it was a special one for Leo and myself, as well. I’m so blown away with the experience of going to a Yankees game with the new stadium. It’s just unbelievable. We got on the train and rode the train all the way there. There were all the Yankees fans and a few Texas fans, too, that were on the train. It was Thursday afternoon; 1:05 p.m. game and I couldn’t believe how many people were at this game. It was incredible. I think for Leo, baseball might not be quite as exciting for him as Monster Trucks because I did take him to Monster Trucks this year, too; and he seemed to be in that and not pulling on me going, okay I’ve seen this. This is cool, but I’m ready to go home (laughs). But yeah, it was a great father/son experience and I had a lot of fun doing that.”
 
PEOPLE TALK ABOUT HIS TRACK AS HAVING A LOT OF CHARACTER. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THIS KENTUCKY TRACK?
“If you are trying to be kind to the bumps, then you’d call it ‘character’. I don’t even see how we make it through a race here from a mechanical standpoint. This place is so hard on the driveline and the suspension components, shocks, and springs. The loads are just unbelievable. But if you just look at the pure grip level of the race track, that part of it I really like. The transitions make this a very tricky track. It’s pretty flat from the back straightaway to Turn 3; plus there’s a huge bump going in there.
 
“So, it really makes you work hard and it’s hard to get the car working right in every aspect of the track. And the bumps are definitely one of the things that do challenge the cars and the set-ups. So, I like the fact that those challenges allow you, as a driver, to have to search around the race track. The car is never going to be perfect and you’re going to slide around. And that seems to suit me a little bit better than some of these new super-fast, high-grip race tracks that we go to.”
 
CAN YOU GO ON THE TRAIN AND TAKE LEO AND MERGE WITH THE FANS AND NOT BE JEFF GORDON? OR, DO YOU GET RECOGNIZED?
“I saw one couple looking at me, but they didn’t say anything. Nobody said anything to me. I would say 99% of the people on that train had no idea who I was. At the game, once I got inside, there were several people that came up to me and were really kind, and everything. But it wasn’t a distraction from me and Leo being able to have a special moment.
 
“But we got back on the train and not one single person said anything to me. And that’s one of the things I love about New York. I go through that on a day-to-day basis up there.  When you do get recognized, it’s actually a moment where you’re like wow, I can’t believe somebody recognized me in New York City! I did have one kid the other day. I had picked up my daughter. She was at this little camp and we were going back to the apartment and what’s real popular is these kids that ride these bikes that can take maybe two or three people in the back. I can’t remember what they call them. But, the guy had my hat on. And so I came up to a stop and he was next to me and I looked at him and I thought it was a No. 24 hat and I said, ‘Nice hat’. And he looked at me and said, ‘Thanks’. We went up to the next hat and I said, ‘Do you know why I said, ‘Nice hat’? He kind of looked at me and I said, ‘That’s me’. And he said, ‘Oh, yeah, it is’! (laughter). So I walked right by him and he didn’t know. And even if there are fans there, which there are plenty of fans in New York City, but a lot of times they just don’t expect you to come walking by.”
 
THE INDIANAPOLIS MOTOR SPEEDWAY IS TALKING ABOUT 40 MILLION DOLLARS WORTH OF IMPROVEMENTS TO A TRADITIONAL HISTORIC TRACK.  WHAT WOULD BE BEST TO SPEND THAT MONEY ON FOR DRIVER’S AND FAN?  WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT LIGHTS AT THE INDIANAPOLIS MOTOR SPEEDWAY? 

“Well, you have to understand from a fans stand point I’ve never, not since I went to an Indy 500 when I was a kid, have I sat in the grand stands.   I think the fans are much more in tune with what’s going on from a fan stand point where that money would suit their needs.  From our stand point that track is very difficult to get a tire.  It’s a very abrasive race track and Goodyear is very challenged with the race track.  I’m not saying repave, but just wondering how we could make it a little less abrasive.
 
“Lights… I mean lights would be cool.  Lights are cool everywhere, I love racing under the lights.  I don’t know what it costs for lights around Indianapolis, but Indianapolis is already to me one of the top facilities that we go to.  The garage area is immaculate.  They just do everything first class there.  Where they located the tunnels you don’t even feel a bump when you go over them like every other track we go to.  You can rid
e around there and tell them exactly where the tunnel is because there is a huge dip there.  You don’t get that at Indianapolis.  Once you get outside the race track and outside the garage area I really couldn’t tell you accurately where it would be good to spend some of that money.
 
“We know that our race has had its challenges as far as the crowd.  When I first started going to Indianapolis in 1994 with the Cup cars I mean the people lined up 10 deep around the garage area and filled the grand stands.  It was standing room only.  It sure would be nice to know why that hasn’t continued and how we get back to that.  That would be awesome.  I love racing there.  Just the history of that place is second to none for me who went to an Indianapolis 500 as a kid and went to high school around Indiana and always wanted to race at Indy.” 
 
IF YOU WIN HERE AT KENTUCKY SPEEDWAY YOU HAVE A WIN AT EVERY ACTIVE TRACK CURRENTLY IN THE SPRINT CUP SERIES.  WOULD THAT BE MEANINGFUL TO YOU? 

“Oh my God that would be huge.  Number one because this is a very challenging race track, not an easy race track to win on.  Number two is I don’t know what the plan is for adding race tracks in the future, but in the past every time we knock one off and get close to accomplishing that goal.  Which I think that would be a pretty awesome thing to accomplish, they add another race track.  So, getting a win at Homestead and Phoenix and getting closer to accomplishing that and knowing that there is one left and we are running good this weekend.  That would be huge.  That would be something that I would be very proud of.”
 
IT’S A LONG YEAR.  OVER THE COURSE OF YOUR CAREER HAVE YOU EVER HAD A HARD TIME KEEPING FOCUSED THROUGH THIS SUMMER STRETCH?  HOW MUCH OF A CHALLENGE IS THAT? 

“It’s tough.  I don’t know I feel like I’m kind of like a fine wine, I get better with age.  I feel like that is the same way my season goes.  I feel like we get better as the season goes on.  Sometimes, especially with a new car things change over the off season and I feel like as I get older, a little more set in my ways, it takes me a little bit longer to adapt to changes.  So throughout the season I feel like I get more and more comfortable and understand what I need and the team can help me accomplish that.  That is why I think the old point system worked so well for me because I think that we were able to look at 36 weeks as a total instead of 26 and 10.  I don’t know.
 
“I feel like one thing I’m very good at is pace of being able to adjust my schedule. To look out throughout the whole year on whether it be sponsor commitments, fan commitments, team commitments, family commitments and balancing out that very well to maintain a focus to be strong the second half of the season and not wear myself out.  This year I think a little bit more of a challenge with the testing schedule for the teams.  Like this week for instance teams got back Monday morning basically and they are coming here Wednesday afternoon.  That to me is tougher on the teams.  I feel like it’s always been tougher on the teams.  As a driver I feel like I’m able to maintain pretty well.”
 
WHAT IS IT THAT MARK MARTIN HAS BEEN ABLE TO DO WHERE HE CAN ADAPT TO ALL THESE DIFFERENT ERAS? 
“Mark (Martin) is a very unique race car driver.  One is I think he has always been one of the most talented race car drivers that there is. He has driven every kind of race car on different types of race tracks and been successful.  Started at a young age, so I think he is just tremendously talented, but I think if you look at the way he has treated his body it tells you that this guy likes a challenge.  He likes to push himself and that he is disciplined.  I think that is what gives you longevity in a sport when you have the talent.  He is able to align himself with good quality teams and equipment and people.  Then he is able to give results.  I think that is just a reflection on who he is and what kind of race car driver he is.”  

Chevy Racing–Kentucky–Post Qualifying

NASCAR SPRINT CUP SERIES
QUAKER STATE 400
KENTUCKY SPEEDWAY
TEAM CHEVY QUALIFYING NOTES AND QUOTES
JUNE 28, 2013
 
DALE EARNHARDT, JR., NO. 88 NATIONAL GUARD YOUTH FOUNDATION CHEVROLET SS – POLE WINNER
ON HIS LAP:
“We like the bumps; at least in the corners anyways. It was a great lap. This National Guard Chevrolet had good grip and good speed and we had a cool race track. We had a lot of shade there for a couple of guys in front of us. Now the sun is back out so hopefully it’ll slow them other guys down. Steve Letarte (crew chief) and all the guys on the team did a good job putting a good car out there on the line for me.”
 
YOU KNOCKED YOUR TEAMMATE OFF THE POLE.  HOW DID THAT LAP FEEL?
“It felt real good.  I didn’t know that it would be quick enough to beat Jimmie (Johnson) but we had a lot of shade in front of us. About five cars in front of us we got a lot of shade and cooled the track down.  It gave us a good opportunity to put down a lap like that.  Steve Letarte (crew chief), Kevin Meander (engineer) and all the guys on the team did a good job putting a good car out on the grid; give me a good shot at it.  They deserve a lot of credit.  We just tried not to mess it up.  Just tried not to over drive it.”
 
DO YOU HAVE THE POWER TO KEEP THE CLOUDS AWAY FROM THE SUN NOW SINCE THE SUN IS BACK OUT?
“Looks like from where I’m standing there is going to be a good amount of sun for these next several guys at least.  We will see what it does.”  
 
JIMMIE JOHNSON, NO. 48 LOWE’S DOVER WHITE CHEVROLET SS – QUALIFIED THIRD
DID YOU SEE FLAMES COMING OUT?  YOU WERE FLYING IN THIS CAR.  GREAT LAP:
“That was a good lap.  I’m looking under the car because as I crossed the start/finish line I dipped below the racing surface onto the apron.  There is a huge hole down there and it had me airborne.  I’m making sure that my car is alright.”
 
HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THAT LAP?
“I feel good.  I felt (turns) one and two went really well.  (Turns) Three and four I thought maybe I could have been a little faster through there.  We will just see how things play out.  These clouds are coming in and the track is just going to get faster now.  I’m not sure we will still stay on the pole, but hopefully it will get us a nice top-five.  I would like to be top four.  There are really four good pit stalls on pit road.  If we can be in the top four that would be job well done.”
 
DID YOU KNOCK A FILLING OUT WITH THAT RUN?
“I dipped down below the racing line on the apron across the start/finish line to make the track a little shorter. There is a big jump down there! So, my younger brother, Jarit, is racing in Crandon (Wisconsin) in an off-road truck this weekend, so I wanted to get airborne myself and go down there and catch a little air. It doesn’t look as exciting as it felt in the car. But the car’s not designed for that.”
 
THAT’S BECAUSE YOU’VE ONLY GOT A COUPLE OF INCHES OF TRAVEL. THIS ISN’T YOUR BAJA CAR
“Yeah, a couple inches of travel that droop, let alone the 16th or an 8th when you’re down on the bump stops and all. But wow, that was exciting. The lap was good; a very, very good lap. I think in (Turns) 1 and 2 was spot-on; (Turns) 3 and 4, somebody could probably get through there quicker. And all these clouds are coming. So that’s going to hurt me a little bit with the guys that go later.”
 
RYAN NEWMAN, NO. 39 QUICKEN LOANS CHEVROLET SS – QUALIFIED SEVENTH
PRETTY FAST LAP TODAY EVEN THOUGH JIMMIE JOHNSON MIGHT BE TAKING YOUR TITLE HERE TODAY:
“Jimmie (Johnson) had a heck of a lap there is no doubt about that.  I told my guys that catching a cloud wasn’t going to be good enough.  We were going to need to catch a layer of two or three clouds to run a 48.  I was impressed with the effort that the guys did with the Quicken Loans Chevrolet.  We picked up on it.  Definitely feel that a little bit of cloud cover didn’t hurt us.  We made some improvements and we beat a lot of cars that beat us in practice.  We will keep working on it.”
 
DO YOU FEEL LIKE THE STEWART-HAAS ORGANIZATION IS KIND OF GETTING BACK ON TRACK AND CAUGHT UP WITH THE GEN-6 CAR?
“I don’t know about that.  I’m more focused on the No. 39 side and what we are doing.  Collectively we have to have the right tools to work with.  I never thought we didn’t have the right tools to work with we just have to make the car fast.  That is not easy to do.  There is so much complex things that are going on underneath what you guys see as the car shell which is really cool in the (Chevy) SS that it’s not easy.”
 
JUAN PABLO MONTOYA, NO. 42 TARGET CHEVROLET SS – QUALIFIED 10TH
ON HIS QUALIFYING LAP:
“It was okay we really struggled in qualifying trim in practice.  Everybody on the Target team did a really good job, good changes.  I could have gotten out of the car a little bit more I think.  But it’s hard because it’s so much quicker than before it’s hard to know what you are going to get.”
 
JEFF GORDON, NO. 24 DRIVE TO END HUNGER CHEVROLET SS – QUALIFIED 12TH
ON HIS QUALIFYING LAP:
“I mean you definitely want to get a cloud if you can, but it’s cooled down in my opinion since practice, so the times should be better than they are.  We just missed the balance through (turns) one and two.  The car was perfect through (turns) three and four, but (turns) one and two really tight.  It hurt our lap, but we have a good race car so I’m excited about the race.”
 
JEFF BURTON, NO. 31 CATERPILLAR CHEVROLET SS – QUALIFIED 14TH
TALK ABOUT YOUR QUALIFYING LAP AND HOW YOU FEEL LIKE YOUR CAR IS FOR THE RACE:
“I mean it’s pretty disappointing there.  A couple of things we are going to be on the wrong side of the clouds.  We probably made too many adjustments trying to tighten up.  We just got way too tight.  Just let a lot of speed off of it because I couldn’t be in the gas.  Pretty disappointing that is not going to be anywhere near like we were in practice.  It is what it is and we will make it work.  I do feel like we are really good in race trim.  I feel like we have an understanding of what we need going into the race so we will see what we can get.  I thought we would qualify a lot better than that.”
 
KASEY KAHNE, NO. 5 QUAKER STATE CHEVROLET SS – QUALIFIED 21ST
ON HIS QUALIFYING LAP:
“It felt good.  It felt a lot better than we did in practice, just a little bit on the free side.  That was much better than being tight like we had been all day.  It was good.  The guys made some good adjustments and hopefully that holds off for somewhere in the top-15.  I don’t really know.  It’s hard to say I feel like it’s hotter out and then people going late you know does that help or not?  I don’t know.  We will see kind of where that ends up.”
 
KEVIN HARVICK, NO. 29 BUDWEISER CHEVROLET SS – QUALIFIED 22ND
TALK ABOUT YOUR QUALIFYING LAP.  IT APPEARS YOU JUST CAUGHT THE END OF A CLOUD:
“I wish we would have been about five minutes later on that one.  We knew with the early draw that it was kind of going to be hit or miss.  If that one (cloud) brings some rain that would be the only good thing that could come out of that cloud for us going so early.  All in all they did a good job and made the car…that is four tenths faster than we ran in our mock qualifying run at the end.  We knew it wasn’t going to be very good with our draw.  We have a good race car.”
 
AUSTIN DILLON, NO. 51 ALSCO CHEVROLET SS – QUALIFIED 26TH
ON HIS QUALIFYING LAP:
“The Cup car is pretty good.  The Phoenix Racing Chevrolet was really good in r
ace trim.  I was too loose right there in qualifying trim, but second car out it’s a little difficult to really know what you’ve got.  It’s a good run in our Nationwide car to get the pole; going after our third straight win here so it’s been a good day.”
 

Chevy Racing–Kentucky Post Qualifying–Dale Earnhardt Jr.

NASCAR SPRINT CUP SERIES
QUAKER STATE 400
KENTUCKY SPEEDWAY
TEAM CHEVY POST QUALIFYING PRESS CONFERENCE TRANSCRIPT
JUNE 28, 2013
 
 
DALE EARNHARDT, JR. CAPTURES POLE FOR SATURDAY’S QUAKER STATE 400
FOUR TEAM CHEVY DRIVERS WILL START IN TOP-10
 
SPARTA, KY – June 28, 2013 – Dale Earnhardt Jr., No. 88 National Guard Youth Foundation Chevrolet SS, captured his first pole of the 2013 season and first of his career at Kentucky Speedway with a lap of 29.406 seconds and average speed of 183.686 mph which smashed the previous track record.  This is the 39-year-old driver’s 12th pole in 486 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series races. His Hendrick Motorsports teammate and winner of the event’s pole in 2012, Jimmie Johnson, qualified third in his No. 48 Lowe’s Dover White Chevrolet.
 
Starting behind Earnhardt, Jr. and Johnson inside the top-10 will be Ryan Newman, No. 39 Quicken Loans Chevrolet SS, who will take the green flag from the seventh position.  Juan Pablo Montoya, No. 42 Target Chevrolet SS, will make his fourth top-10 start of the season beginning the 267-lap contest from the 10th positon.
 
Other Team Chevy drivers qualifying in the top-20 were:  Jeff Gordon, No. 24 Drive to End Hunger Chevy SS – 12th and Jeff Burton, No. 31 Caterpillar Chevrolet – 14th.
 
Rounding out the top-five starters, Carl Edwards (Ford) qualified second, Kyle Busch (Toyota) will start fourth and Marcos Ambrose (Ford) qualified fifth.
 
The third-annual Quaker State 400 will take the green flag on Saturday, June 29th at 7:30 p.m. ET and will be aired live on TNT.
 
DALE EARNHARDT, JR., NO. 88 NATIONAL GUARD YOUTH FOUNDATION CHEVROLET SS – POLE WINNER
 
TALK ABOUT THIS RACE TRACK YOU HAVE BEEN HERE A FEW YEARS NOW THE CARS WERE FLYING AROUND OUT THERE JUST TALK ABOUT HOW THIS RACE TRACK IS HANDLING AND HOW YOU THINK THAT NO. 88 CAR IS GOING TO DO TOMORROW NIGHT:
“Well, I think we got great speed and we are real competitive.  Worked on some things in practice and found what we think the car likes and what the car is going to want as far as our wedge trace and the balance of the car.  I like the track; it’s got a lot of age on the asphalt, which we like.  We widen out the groove in the corners which as a driver you like you can run the bottom, the top you have a lot of different options.  You are not really limited and restricted as to where you can run in the corners.  We don’t really mind the bumps in the corners it just kind of adds character when they are not very severe.  There are some pretty bad bumps on the front straightaway that aren’t a ton of fun, but they don’t really affect how the car drives.  You just kind of go through them.  I enjoy the track I think it’s a great area and we have a lot of fans here.  It’s a fun track to run on, race on.  We thought we had a top-five car in practice and we got some good cloud cover about six or seven cars in front of us before we went to qualify and that brought the track temp down to give us a good advantage.  Give us an opportunity to run a bit quicker lap than maybe what the car had in it.  Steve (Letarte, crew chief) and Kevin Meander (engineer) and the team put a good car out there that rolled the center and turned really well and actually went through (turns) three and four very good.  Looking at the trace on NASCAR.com it seemed like we got through (turns) three and four better than most.
 
“In between the last practice and qualifying I got my hair cut at Great Clips.  I think that might have had something to do with it too.  I don’t mind letting that sneak right out of the bag because they are one of my sponsors.  I really did.  It happened.  I was a little lazy this week.  It’s been a few weeks since I had my hair cut.  Luckily somebody from Great Clips was here that could get the job done.”
 
CARL EDWARDS SAID THAT IN HIS ESTIMATION YOU RAN A PERFECT LAP.  I WANT TO KNOW IF YOU FELT THAT WAY TOO AND DID YOU FEEL LIKE THE CLOUD WAS A REAL DIFFERENCE MAKER?
“I think that the cloud cover at least gave us a bit of speed.  It’s hard to say of course the cooler track temps gives the car more grip.  I would admit that I think we definitely had the better situation of anyone in practice with that scenario.  There were some clouds that came in later in the qualifying session, but not quite the extent of what we had.  I did think the lap was really good.  I got into turn one a little bit over zealous.  The car actually was working a little bit better as far as turning through the middle than it had in practice.  That was able to keep the lap relatively competitive in (turns) one and two even though I over drove the car getting into turn one a little bit.  (Turns) Three and four was just a real good corner.  I think we did everything we could do down there.  If anything we could have backed up turn one and maybe run a little bit better down the back straightaway.”

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR TOMORROW?  IT LOOKED LIKE AS FAR AS THE 10 LAP AVERAGES THAT THEY WERE MUCH SLOWER.  I ASSUME YOU HAVE PRETTY QUICK TIRE WEAR OFF HERE:
“The tire wear, the fall off is not very big. It seems like there is not a lot of fall off in lap time throughout the runs.  There haven’t been, there wasn’t last year and there wasn’t in the Truck race.  The track gets a lot freer as it gets cooler.  We will anticipate that. We will look over our notes tonight and look at everything we did in practice.  We did a bunch of different scenarios as far as how we thought the car might want to work.  We found some things that we liked and we can go over those notes and look at that.  We really have to guess on how tight we think the car needs to be.  The car definitely is going to free up as it gets cooler and cooler.  I really basically didn’t change much in my car from practice to qualifying and it turned quite a bit better.  I know by the time the race starts and half way into the race it’s going to keep freeing up just like it did in the Truck race last night.  We had that in our notes from last year that this place really gets freer as you get on deeper into the event.  We just hope we make the right calls.  Everybody in the garage area has got to try to guesstimate and make the right assumption on what they think the track is going to do and how much to push that button.  I think we have a good idea.  I feel pretty confident, pretty good.  We have good speed and I think we are making the right choice on what we are going to do.  What we have talked about doing for our balance and the set-up we are going to put in it.”
 
CLINT BOWYER SAID YOU GOT A CLOUD AND HE GOT THE DESERT ON HIS QUALIFYING RUN.   CAN YOU RELATE TO THE DRIVERS THAT WERE JEALOUS OF THE CLOUDS THAT YOU GOT?
“Yeah, he got some shade on his lap.  I was watching because I heard him say that.  He had some shade, but he wasn’t able to produce.  I’m just saying.  He had a tough lap.    I was watching him in practice and just looking from the lap times, I would guess that he wasn’t very pleased with his car in the first place.
 
I was sitting on pit road right before we were about to go out and there had been about six or seven cars that had gone before me that had cloud cover.   I was thinking in my mind that the track temps were coming down more and more, and if we don’t get any sun, it’s going to continue to come down and the track is going to get more speed and I can drive it down in the corner.  I knew I would be able to depend on the right rear tire to hook up off the corner and I was going to have a real good opportunity there.    And for some reason this year, they delay the cars and th
ere is a bigger delay between cars and I don’t know why.  I suppose it has something to do with the television broadcast but there is a huge delay it feels when you are sitting in the car.  I was like, ‘come on, let’s go’, and then you wait for what seems like two minutes waiting for them to go, waiting for them to tap the hood.    I was just hoping the sun would not come out while all of this was going on.  Luckily enough, the cloud cover was heavy enough when we got out there, but I think it makes a big difference.”
 
HOW IS YOUR CAR RIGHT NOW?
“I feel pretty good about it.  I thought we had…..like I said, we tried several different scenarios with completely different set-ups, went through a lot of different stuff in practice, and we feel like we understand what the car is asking for and what is going to make the car competitive.   We went in that direction for qualifying and we did rather well in qualifying.  We are making the right decisions for what we want to put in our car and it’s a little bit different than our teammates, but we think that is what our car is asking for and that is what we have had success with in the past.   So we are leaning on some notes from last year and believe we made the right choice.  We have a long race to sort it out if we start off with the balance a little bit off and I feel like Steve (Letarte) is a good enough crew chief to make the right adjustments to get us going and get the speed in the car that we need to run well.”
 
JIMMIE JOHNSON, NO. 48 LOWE’S DOVER WHITE CHEVROLET SS – QUALIFIED THIRD:
POST QUALIFYING PRESS CONFERENCE TRANSCRIPT
 
TALK ABOUT YOUR QUALIFYING LAP. THERE WILL CERTAINLY BE A LOT OF FAST RACE CARS OUT THERE TOMORROW NIGHT:
“Yeah, I was really happy with my lap; (Turns) 1 and 2 went really well for me. In (Turns) 3 and 4, I felt like I left a little bit on the table. But still, the gap that we had on people and the fact that we had a track record, I got a little optimistic. And not long after that (Dale Earnhardt) Junior took us down. So, it was a very good and comfortable lap. The most exciting part of the lap for me was going under the yellow line on the frontstretch and hitting that ‘jump’ down there (laughs). It doesn’t look all that spectacular on television, but when you’re off the ground in a car that’s not designed to be leave the ground, it’s very exciting.”
 
WHEN YOU TRYING TO LOOK AT THE SKY AND SEE IF THERE IS A CLOUD THERE, IS THERE A SCIENCE IN TRYING TO TIME IT? CAN YOU TAKE A LITTLE BIT LONGER TO ROLL OFF AND HOPE THERE IS MORE CLOUD COVER OR ANYTHING THAT WILL HELP YOU? OR, DO YOU JUST GO AND HOPE FOR THE BEST?
“Yeah, you can. It’s tough from inside the seat to know how long a cloud is going to last or how far one is away. So, you can take a little advice from your crew chief and maybe stall things 30 seconds and not get going right away, but that’s about as big a window as you can really mess with because you’ve got someone hammering on the front of the car to take off. But, yeah, that’s really about all you can do. Nobody would ever do that, either (laughter); none of us. What I was going to say is it’s interesting to me because the way the procedure has been for the last however long, the guys you had to worry about, you were all grouped together and the cloud wouldn’t affect things as much. And I kind of forgot about clouds and the importance of them. And then this year, and especially this weekend, it’s made a big difference and it really does. There’s some luck to that. Not every crew chief and driver is looking to the sky and trying to figure out where a cloud is.”
 

Chevy Racing–Kentucky–Jimmie Johnson

NASCAR SPRINT CUP SERIES
QUAKER STATE 400
KENTUCKY SPEEDWAY
TEAM CHEVY DRIVER PRESS CONFERENCE TRANSCRIPT
JUNE 28, 2013
 
JIMMIE JOHNSON, NO. 48 LOWE’S/DOVER WHITE CHEVROLET SS, met with members of the media at Kentucky Speedway and discussed his mindset with 10 races left before the start of the Chase, what changed his feelings about racing at Kentucky, his thoughts on why it can be so difficult transitioning from IndyCar to NASCAR and much more. Full transcript.
 
TALK ABOUT YOUR MINDSET WITH 10 RACES LEFT BEFORE THE CHASE AND THIS WEEKEND HERE AT KENTUCKY.
“It definitely is an important time of the year for everybody. I looked around 10th (place) and how tight that is. If you’re on that eighth to 14th bubble right there, it’s getting really tense right now and it will over these next 10 weeks. Life is pretty comfortable up where we are. We can still squander away the position we are in and have trouble. But fortunately, now that I think it through a little more, with those three wins we should be in great shape. With all that in mind, we just need to focus on being strong, finishing up these next 10 races, entering the Chase, as competitive as we can. Certainly race tracks that we run on such as Loudon (New Hampshire) here next weekend or in a couple of weeks, whatever it is, we want to leave there knowing we’ve had a good race because obviously we come back and race there in the Chase. It’s an important 10 weeks for everybody. There is more pressure on some than others, but the real pressure will come in Chicago and hopefully we’ll be in contention at that point.”
 
YOU ARE GOING TO HIT SOME OF THE TRACKS THAT YOU’VE ALREADY RACED AT THIS YEAR, NORMALLY THERE IS NOT A GREAT DEAL OF DIFFERENCE WHEN YOU GO FROM ONE TIME TO ANOTHER AS FAR AS CHANGE IN THE COMPETITION, BUT WITH THE NEW CAR WILL THERE BE MORE OPPORTUNITIES FOR GUYS TO BE BETTER THE SECOND TIME AROUND?
“Daytona I don’t think so because the rules are so strict and there is very little area to grow and learn. Pocono for sure. I’m trying to think of another track we repeat too. We certainly do later in the year. Loudon is a good example, and Dover. Tracks like that. Absolutely, every time we go to the track the whole field is smarter. Like for us going to Pocono, we just hope whatever they gain on us we’re able to extend for unselfish reasons. Yeah, this garage area is smart. In two to three weeks’ time technology changes and what you had a month ago doesn’t work.”
 
EVEN THOUGH THIS IS ONLY THE THIRD RACE HERE FOR THE SPRINT CUP, WHEN YOU GO TO A TRACK THAT YOU HAVEN’T WON AT DOES THAT GIVE YOU SOMETHING TO REALLY SHOOT AT BECAUSE OBVIOUSLY YOU WANT TO WIN EVERY WEEK?
“It gets me excited. There’s five tracks left that I haven’t won at. I think (Tony) Stewart is down to two or three. We don’t talk about it amongst Stewart, (Jeff) Gordon or myself, but I think we all secretly would love to be the first to win at every track that we compete at. I think Stewart is the closest right now. I want to get closer. I’ve been very close here. I’ve been very close at Michigan. I’ve been very close at Chicago. So, I hope we can get one or two of them this year. I would love to start here.”
 
IT’S SUCH A LONG SEASON, HOW DO YOU STAY MENTALLY FOCUSED DURING THIS STRETCH IN THE SUMMER THAT SEEMS LIKE ITS NEVER GOING TO END?
“It still feels like it’s not going to end. There’s no doubt about it. There’s still a lot of racing left. Our last off weekend is in a few weeks then we have to grind it out after that. It goes in phases and the situation we are in with the strong start to the season, we are in a comfortable position because of the win and the points, but at the same time as we get closer to the start of the Chase we need to make sure we are peaking at the right time and that we didn’t peak too early. So we have that pressure and motivation on our side. When the final 10 (races) starts it’s just brutal. You live week to week, and honestly in some situations you live day to day at the track and what kind of speed your car has. That takes it to a whole new level. Then we have our short off season to recover, load up and do it again.”
 
THIS YEAR YOU ARE DRIVING A CAR THAT LOOKS MORE LIKE THE MANUFACTURER CAR, THE ONE THAT RUNS ON THE STREET, HOW’S THAT RESONATING WITH FANS, SPONSORS WHO WANT A CAR THAT LOOKS LIKE THEIR CAR?
“Yeah, it’s been very well accepted by the race teams, drivers, fans, manufacturers. When you look at the first quarter of the year, especially starting at Daytona with the buzz around the new car and everybody seeing it in competition for the first time, it’s been a great launch of the Gen-6 car. I know that all the manufacturers are pleased the style of the car, the connection between the showroom and the race track. Hopefully it’s a good sign of things to come in the future. The manufacturers are very important to our sport. They always have been. Due to officiating things changed to the Gen-5 car, but now the focus has gone back to the manufacturers and their own brand identity.”
 
LAST YEAR YOU TALKED ABOUT BEFORE THE RACE THAT YOU DIDN’T LIKE THIS PLACE VERY MUCH AND THEN YOU WENT OUT AND WON THE POLE, ONE YEAR LATER HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT IT NOW?
“Since I’ve been here to compete in the Cup car, I’ve really liked the track. I think I qualified in the top five for the first one and ran well. Last year we qualified on the pole and were very competitive in the race. Where the dislike came from was through my Nationwide days. I tore up a few cars here. Then prior to my Cup start at Hendrick, we were able to test here. There were teams here every week working away. I piled a bunch of them over there in between (turns) three and four. So coming back I was a little concerned about that, but things have been very good since I’ve been in competition in the Cup car.”
 
JUSTIN ALLGAIER SAID ABOUT A WEEK AND A HALF AGO THAT HE BELIEVES THAT TURN THREE HERE IS ONE OF THE MORE CRITICAL TURNS TO GET DOWN; YOU JUST MENTIONED THAT WHEN YOU WERE TESTING YOU PILED SOME CARS IN THAT CORNER, WHAT IS IT ABOUT THAT TURN? DO YOU FEEL LIKE THAT IS A KEY PART OF THIS RACE TRACK?
“Yeah, I do for me. When we were testing here the entry is so flat and you really don’t pick up the banking until almost the physical center of the corner that I would lose the back of my car on the corner entry and spin out and smack the fence. Now it’s changed quite a bit. The track is so rough starting with the very end of the straightaway before you turn off the corner, it’s almost like you hit a curve. Inside the car it’s big. It’s a forceful impact. It just limits your speed into the corner then shortly after that you get into a series of bumps. I think that is where my fondness for the track has come around. When it was smooth and easy to get through there I would just bust my butt over there and make a mistake. Now you’ve got to slow down, deal with the bumps. Your car set up is very important. Your line selection is very important. You can move around two to three feet through the entry to the center of the corner over there and find like little valleys and miss the bumps to improve your lap time dramatically. That aspect of it makes it really fun for the drivers because you have some option and you just don’t chase the white line around the track.”
 
YOU ARE IN A DOMINANT POSITION AND DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT THINGS. BUT, AT WHAT POINT IN THE RACE TO THE CHASE DO DRIVERS BEGIN TO WORRY ABOUT WHAT THEY NEED TO DO TO LOCK THEMSELVES IN COME SEPTEMBER?
“Honestly, we are all worrying. Even in the dominant position we’re in, we look back at the last three or four races and see missed opportunity; and we know that we left some bonus points on the table, plus points in general, if we were in the Chase. You can’t win a championship that way with Dover and Michigan. Sonoma turned out okay, but you can’t make those mistakes. So, although it looks like we’re just
cruising along and smiling, we have a lot of pressure on ourselves to perform at the level we need to. But, the other teams in that ‘bubble’ area, you’ll see a lot of testing or hear about a lot of testing. Teams have been very smart about reserving test sessions and as we get closer to the Chase, I think you’ll see a lot of teams in that 8th to 14th or 8th to 12th range using those test sessions to make sure they have good finishes and collect a lot of points.”
 
DO YOU HAVE A TESTING SCHEDULE AT THIS POINT?
“No, fortunately, the last I heard was that we’re still sitting on them and hopefully will use them on all Chase tracks. We’ll see how that goes. Jeff (Gordon) is obviously in a tough position and we need to make sure we get him in the Chase. But right now, we haven’t really picked any tracks yet.”
 
IT’S BEEN A TOUGH TRANSITION FOR DANICA PATRICK, AND YOU LOOK AT SAM HORNISH AND DARIO FRANCHITTI.  WHY IS THAT TRANSITION SO DIFFICULT? IF YOU TRIED IT IN REVERSE AND TRIED TO GO TO INDYCAR AT THIS POINT IN YOUR CAREER, WOULD IT BE DIFFERENT?
“When I look at the vehicles, the way you make them handle, the downforce numbers, the mechanical grip, if you look and compare downforce versus vehicle, mechanical grip, the Cup car has a lot of mechanical grip and very little downforce. It’s just the opposite for an IndyCar race car. I know when I raced a GRAND-AM car, the way you use the brakes in a braking zone it totally different than if you do the same thing in a Cup car on the same track at Watkins Glen. Granted they all have four wheels, but they are very, very different.
 
“One other element that’s involved in all of this, and I think it’s something that’s always worked in my favor, because I’m used to running side-by-side with people in racing. And I’m a far better racer than I am somebody who qualifies or posts practice speeds. And IndyCar guys and girls don’t have a lot of side-by-side racing. They do, kind of now on the 1.5-mile ovals they run on, but it’s like a plate track running wide-open. It’s not the competitive passing and racing and fighting for position like you see in NASCAR. And it takes a while to figure it out.
 
“Even with my background, I can remember my first three races in ASA that I ran, I would catch a car and be stuck behind it and couldn’t pass it. I remember being on the radio and being upset that I didn’t know how to pass the car. It took time to figure out how to do that. So, when I summarize it all, it’s really that they are different cars. And then the racing that takes place on the track, the door-to-door racing and where you position your car to keep the air on it so you don’t make a mistake and how you can affect others around you to get the position, that’s just something that takes laps. I have a lot of friends that race in other series that want to come NASCAR racing and I tell them all they need a five-year plan before you have high expectations. You need to go out there and hit walls. You need to make mistakes. You need to make people mad. That’s what you do. You have to go out there and learn and learn through experience.
 
“In time, you see Sam is really off to a great year in Nationwide winning races and leading the championship at times. I think he’s proof that you just need time. He’s a great driver. He just needs to figure it all out in this style of car. Just to finish up my long story, I’d be very interested to watch a closed-bodied driver go to an open-wheel vehicle. Guys that I’ve talked to that have come our direction like Dario, and maybe even Juan (Montoya), when you take the downforce off the car your eyes are calibrated for a certain speed and it’s tough for them to come our direction. I’m very curious too, to what it’s like to go from a car that doesn’t stick in the corner all that well to something that has a lot of grip.
 
 
“Would the transition be easier going from our car to theirs? I have the same question. I don’t know the answer. But I do know, you’re going to race for a win. You’re not just going to show up in your first year and race for a win, but theoretically there’s an argument that going from low downforce to high downforce is an easier transition than the other way.”
 

Chevy Racing-Kentucky- Dale Earnhardt Jr.

NASCAR SPRINT CUP SERIES
QUAKER STATE 400
KENTUCKY SPEEDWAY
TEAM CHEVY DRIVER PRESS CONFERENCE TRANSCRIPT
JUNE 28, 2013
 
DALE EARNHARDT, JR., NO. 88 NATIONAL GUARD YOUTH FOUNDATION CHEVROLET SS, met with the media following a press conference announcing his involvement with the National Guard Youth Foundation, specifically to draw attention to the nation’s alarming high school dropout rate by promoting the National Guard Youth Challenge program. During his time with the media he discussed his season thus far, racing at Kentucky Speedway and other topics.  FULL TRANSCRIPT:
 
YOU ARE ONE DRIVER THAT IS STILL LOOKING FOR A WIN THIS YEAR AND WON LAST YEAR.  HOW MUCH DOES NOT WINNING WEIGH ON YOUR MIND RIGHT NOW?  HOW URGENT DO YOU FEEL YOU NEED TO GET A WIN BEFORE THE CHASE?
“I think we keep working hard the wins will come.  We have had some really fast cars, just had some bad luck.  Thought we had an opportunity to win at Michigan and just with the engine failure we weren’t able to get that done.  If we just keep working and running well we will get our opportunities to get to Victory Lane.”
 
KYLE PETTY GOES ON TV YESTERDAY AND SAY’S THAT DANICA PATRICK IS NOT A RACE CAR DRIVER.  YOUR EXPERIENCE WITH HER IS EXTENSIVE DO YOU AGREE OR DISAGREE WITH KYLE’S STATEMENT?
“I have to disagree with Kyle (Petty).  I think she is a tough competitor and she works really hard at what she does.  She has run some really good races.  On every occasion she is out running several guys out on the circuit.  If she was not able to compete and not able to run minimum speed or finish in last place every week I think you might be able to say Kyle has an argument.  But she’s out there running competitively and running strong on several accounts.  I think that she has got a good opportunity and a rightful position in the sport to keep competing and she just might surprise even Kyle Petty.”
 
TOP-FIVE HERE LAST YEAR DO YOU HAVE A LOT OF CONFIDENCE COMING INTO THIS TRACK AND DO YOU FEEL LIKE TURN THREE IS ONE OF THOSE CRITICAL PARTS OF THE TRACK THAT YOU HAVE TO GET DOWN?
“Well, it looked critical last night in the Truck race, some guys having some difficulty in turn three. The track is just unique and very bumpy and got a lot of character.  I enjoy racing here.  I think that the track gets better every year.  Just look forward to having a good car.  I’m excited to get out there and get in practice see what kind of speed we have and how competitive the car is.  Hope that we can put together a couple of good days and have a good weekend.  I enjoy coming here and we’ve got a lot of fans in this area that enjoy seeing us race here.”   
 

Richard Childress Racing–Kentucky–Camping World Truck Series Post Race

UNOH 225
Kentucky Speedway
 
NASCAR Camping World Truck Series 
Kentucky Speedway    
June 27, 2013 
 
Race Highlights:
 
Richard Childress Racing teammates finished first (Ty Dillon) and 27th (Brendan Gaughan).
Dillon is third in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series driver championship point standings, 40 markers behind the leader; while Gaughan ranks seventh in the standings, 52 points out of the top spot.
The No. 3 Chevrolet team is fourth in the Camping World Truck Series owner championship point standings, with the No. 62 team eighth in the standings.
According to NASCAR’s Loop Data Statistics, Dillon earned the second-highest Driver Rating (127.3), while Gaughan ranked 18th with a rating of 68.5.
Combined, Dillon and Gaughan posted the Fastest Laps Run 26 times during the event, ranking them third and seventh.
Dillon was the Fastest Driver Late in a Run..
Dillon scored the third-highest Average Running Position of 5.393.
Dillon earned his second-career Camping World Truck Series victory and was followed to the line by Brad Keselowski, Kyle Busch, James Buescher and Ryan Blaney.
The next scheduled Camping World Truck Series race is the American Ethanol 200 presented by Enogen at Iowa Speedway on Saturday, July 13. The ninth race of the 2013 season is scheduled to be televised live on SPEED beginning at 8:30 p.m. Eastern Time and broadcast live on Motor Racing Network.

 
 
Ty Dillon Claws his Way to Victory Lane in Kentucky
 
After battling a loose-handling Chevrolet in qualifying, Ty Dillon and the No. 3 Bass Pro Shops earned their second-career NASCAR Camping World Truck Series victory; doing so at Kentucky Speedway. Starting from the 22nd spot, Dillon began his quest to the front right from the initial green flag. Crew chief Marcus Richmond called for a two-tire pit stop on lap 25, which propelled the Richard Childress Racing driver into the top 10. He battled a temperamental black and orange machine in the late stages of the race, but one last trip to pit road proved to be the ticket on lap 111. The Bass Pro Shops team serviced Dillon with right-side tires, fuel and a chassis adjustment. He restarted sixth and drove through the field taking the top spot on lap 124. Not looking back, Dillon held off all competitors and drove his No. 3 Chevrolet to victory lane for his second career NASCAR win.
 
Start – 22             Finish – 1                     Laps Led – 26               Points – 3rd
 
TY DILLON QUOTE:
“Man, what a night. I can’t thank my guys enough for everything they do for this team. Marcus (Richmond, crew chief) made some awesome calls that put us right where we needed to be to win this race. We started off with a not-so-great qualifying effort, but the No. 3 Bass Pro Shops Chevrolet became a rocket there at the end. The last five laps were the longest ones of my life. I’m so happy to be here in Victory Lane, have this opportunity to race for my grandfather and put on a great show for all the fans. I’m truly blessed.”
 
MARCUS RICHMOND QUOTE:
“This win is for everyone at RCR. We wouldn’t have been able to do this without the support from all the departments back at the shop. ECR engines are great. We had a really fast truck there at the end. Ty started off too loose and I knew if I could get the truck to the tight side, he could wheel it. And, he did. I’m so proud of this Bass Pro Shops team, they work hard and deserved this win.”
 
 
 
 

Brendan Gaughan Beaten by Mechanical Problem at Kentucky
 
Brendan Gaughan and the No. 62 South Point Hotel & Casino Chevrolet started the UNOH 225 NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race at Kentucky Speedway on a high note Thursday night. They qualified their Silverado fourth on the grid with high hopes for an even better finish. Once the initial green flag waved, Gaughan settled into the sixth position and ran there for the early going through lap 25. However, on that circuit around the 1.5-mile speedway, he radioed to crew chief Shane Wilson he had smoke in the cockpit and the oil pressure had dropped. The engine was still running, so Gaughan took his truck to the garage area. The crew quickly assessed the problem and discovered a faulty oil pump was the reason they were on jack stands while everyone else was racing. It was an all-hands effort to make repairs and get back out. They accomplished that on lap 59 returning to action in 32nd place, 34 laps down to the leaders. Through attrition and commitment, Gaughan and the South Point Hotel & Casino team were able to pick up five positions to finish in 27th place, while running top-10 and top-five lap times.
 
Start – 4th                    Finish – 27th                    Laps Led – 0                  Points – 7th
 
BRENDAN GAUGHAN QUOTE:
“That was not the finish this South Point Chevrolet team was looking for or deserved. We had a great qualifying effort and Shane (Wilson, crew chief) made some big changes before we went out there. We were good in the race and just finding our rhythm and stride when we ended up in the garage. But, like I knew we could, we were able to fix it to get back out and earn some points.”
 
 

Casey Currie Challenges at the Front of the Field at LOORS Rounds 7 & 8 from Miller Motorsports Park

Casey Currie and the Monster Energy/General Tire team showed they are a force to be reckoned with in the Pro Lite division by challenging for wins during the 2013 Lucas Oil Off-Road Racing Series (LOORS) visit to Miller Motorsports Park in Tooele, Utah, last weekend. Currie debuted his brand new Monster Energy/General Tire Jeep JK at the picturesque facility, and was in the mix at the front of the field throughout each day of racing before some late misfortune hindered an otherwise impressive weekend. Nevertheless, Currie and his team left Utah with their heads held high and full of confidence heading into the second half of the season.

The weekend prior to the Round 7 & 8, Currie took advantage of the opportunity to get some early track time at Miller Motorsports Park in a LOORS regional event. The information the team gathered was applied to race weekend and it helped position the brand new truck design with the seventh and fifth-fastest lap time in the two Friday practice sessions.
 
Currie and his crew made some additional adjustments heading into the first race of the weekend on Saturday and qualified third that morning. As the green flag waved for the afternoon’s 14-lap Pro Lite Main, Currie positioned the Monster Energy/General Tire Jeep JK into sixth place. After a quick move into the top five, Currie suffered a little trouble and fell 10th early. However, he instantly began an impressive charge through the field over the next nine laps, moving back into the top five and into an intense battle for the podium. Currie attempted to make a pass to put himself in podium position with three laps remaining, and hit one of the K-rails lining the inside and outside of the track resulting in a broken front suspension. Currie was unable to complete the final laps and settled for 20th.
 
“I hate that I made a mistake there right at the end,” said Currie following the race. “The truck was flying and I knew we had enough to get onto the podium, so I tried to take advantage at the first opportunity I saw and just misjudged the inside of the K-rail by one inch. That’s not the way I wanted to end the first day, especially with how hard all of my guys are working, but we know we have a good truck and we’ll look to bounce back on Sunday.”
On Sunday morning, Currie kicked off the eighth round of the season with the third-fastest time in qualifying and showed there were no lasting effects from Saturday’s hard luck. As the race got underway that afternoon, Currie asserted himself in the lead pack and maintained a spot inside the top four for the majority of the 14-lap Pro Lite Main. As the final five laps approached, Currie stepped up his aggression and began to make moves towards the front in his Monster Energy/General Tire Jeep JK. As he attempted to make a pass for the lead on Lap 11, Currie was spun out after contact from another competitor. He got back on the throttle quickly and re-entered the race, salvaging a ninth-place finish.
 
“We’re right there, but we just aren’t having the luck we need at the moment,” said Currie. “I couldn’t be happier with my team and with the momentum we have right now, and we will be a force at the next round in Glen Helen.”